AccueilAccueil  PortailPortail  GalerieGalerie  S'enregistrerS'enregistrer  ConnexionConnexion  

Partagez | 
 

 l'histoire de l'autoradio

Voir le sujet précédent Voir le sujet suivant Aller en bas 
AuteurMessage
Protofuria
Admin
Admin
avatar

Nombre de messages : 7114
Age : 34
Localisation : Metz Beach
Date d'inscription : 20/10/2006

MessageSujet: l'histoire de l'autoradio   Lun 2 Jan 2012 - 22:16

voici un petit cours d'histoire sur l'autoradio. c'est en anglais, mais assez accessible quand meme, s'il y en a que ça interesse vraiment je pourrais attaquer une traduction.

SUNDOWN

One evening in 1929 two young men named William Lear and Elmer Wavering drove their girlfriends to a lookout point high above the Mississippi River town of Quincy, Illinois, to watch the sunset. It was a romantic night to be sure, but one of the girls observed that it would be even nicer if they could listen to music in the car.

Lear and Wavering liked the idea. Both men had tinkered with radios - Lear had served as a radio operator in the U. S. Navy during World War I - and it wasn't long before they were taking apart a home radio and trying to get it to work in a car. But it wasn't as easy as it sounds: automobiles have ignition switches, generators, spark plugs, and other electrical equipment that generate noisy static interference, making it nearly impossible to listen to the radio when the engine was running.

SIGNING ON

One by one, Lear and Wavering identified and eliminated each source of electrical interference. When they finally got their radio to work, they took it to a radio convention in Chicago. There they met Paul Galvin, owner of Galvin Manufacturing Corporation. He made a product called a "battery eliminator" a device that allowed battery-powered radios to run on household AC current. But as more homes were wired for electricity, more radio manufacturers made AC-powered radios. Galvin needed a new product to manufacture. When he met Lear and Wavering at the radio convention, he found it. He believed that mass-produced, affordable car radios had the potential to become a huge business.

Lear and Wavering set up shop in Galvin's factory, and when they perfected their first radio, they installed it in his Studebaker. Then Galvin went to a local banker to apply for a loan. Thinking it might sweeten the deal, he had his men install a radio in the banker's Packard. Good idea, but it didn't work - half an hour after the installation, the banker's Packard caught on fire. (They didn't get the loan.)

Galvin didn't give up. He drove his Studebaker nearly 800 miles to Atlantic City to show off the radio at the 1930 Radio Manufacturers Association convention. Too broke to afford a booth, he parked the car outside the convention hall and cranked up the radio so that passing conventioneers could hear it. That idea worked - he got enough orders to put the radio into production.

WHAT'S IN A NAME

That first production model was called the 5T71. Galvin decided he needed to come up with something a little catchier. In those days many companies in the phonograph and radio businesses used the suffix "ola" for their names - Radiola, Columbiola, and Victrola were three of the biggest. Galvin decided to do the same thing, and since his radio was intended for use in a motor vehicle, he decided to call it the Motorola.

But even with the name change, the radio still had problems:

When Motorola went on sale in 1930, it cost about $110 uninstalled, at a time when you could buy a brand-new car for $650, and the country was sliding into the Great Depression. (By that measure, a radio for a new car would cost about $3,000 today.)
In 1930 it took two men several days to put in a car radio - the dashboard had to be taken apart so that the receiver and a single speaker could be installed, and the ceiling had to be cut open to install the antenna. These early radios ran on their own batteries, not on the car battery, so holes had to be cut into the floorboard to accommodate them. The installation manual had eight complete diagrams and 28 pages of instructions.
HIT THE ROAD

Selling complicated car radios that cost 20 percent of the price of a brand-new car wouldn't have been easy in the best of times, let alone during the Great Depression - Galvin lost money in 1930 and struggled for a couple of years after that. But things picked up in 1933 when Ford began offering Motorolas pre-installed at the factory. In 1934 they got another boost when Galvin struck a deal with B. F. Goodrich tire company to sell and install them in its chain of tire stores. By then the price of the radio, installation included, had dropped to $55. The Motorola car radio was off and running. (The name of the company would be officially changed from Galvin Manufacturing to "Motorola" in 1947.)

In the meantime, Galvin continued to develop new uses for car radios. In 1936, the same year that it introduced push-button tuning, it also introduced the Motorola Police Cruiser, a standard car radio that was factory preset to a single frequency to pick up police broadcasts. In 1940 he developed with the first handheld two-way radio - the Handie-Talkie - for the U. S. Army.

A lot of the communications technologies that we take for granted today were born in Motorola labs in the years that followed World War II. In 1947 they came out with the first television to sell under $200. In 1956 the company introduced the world's first pager; in 1969 it supplied the radio and television equipment that was used to televise Neil Armstrong's first steps on the Moon. In 1973 it invented the world's first handheld cellular phone. Today Motorola is the second-largest cell phone manufacturer in the world. And it all started with the car radio.

WHATEVER HAPPENED TO..

The two men who installed the first radio in Paul Galvin's car, Elmer Wavering and William Lear, ended up taking very different paths in life. Wavering stayed with Motorola. In the 1950's he helped change the automobile experience again when he developed the first automotive alternator, replacing inefficient and unreliable generators. The invention lead to such luxuries as power windows, power seats, and, eventually, air-conditioning.

Lear also continued inventing. He holds more than 150 patents. Remember eight-track tape players? Lear invented that. But what he's really famous for are his contributions to the field of aviation. He invented radio direction finders for planes, aided in the invention of the autopilot, designed the first fully automatic aircraft landing system, and in 1963 introduced his most famous invention of all, the Lear Jet, the world's first mass-produced, affordable business jet. (Not bad for a guy who dropped out of school after the eighth grade

_________________
No offense, but stock is just so damn boring!
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Invité
Invité



MessageSujet: Re: l'histoire de l'autoradio   Mar 3 Jan 2012 - 7:34

demain je peux avoir les origines du bouton d'essui glace en portugrec Evil or Very Mad
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
minicox
MégaSuperVWtiste
MégaSuperVWtiste
avatar

Nombre de messages : 1871
Age : 33
Localisation : dans les bois en compagnie de farfadet
Date d'inscription : 31/08/2009

MessageSujet: Re: l'histoire de l'autoradio   Mar 3 Jan 2012 - 10:01

a mon avis y a pas grand monde qui va capter quelques choses !
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
alex1303
MégaSuperVWtiste
MégaSuperVWtiste
avatar

Nombre de messages : 1377
Age : 38
Localisation : (57)
Date d'inscription : 03/08/2006

MessageSujet: Re: l'histoire de l'autoradio   Mar 3 Jan 2012 - 10:45

minicox a écrit:
a mon avis y a pas grand monde qui va capter quelques choses !

c'est pourtant très intéressant...
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
http://veedub.skynetblogs.be/
minicox
MégaSuperVWtiste
MégaSuperVWtiste
avatar

Nombre de messages : 1871
Age : 33
Localisation : dans les bois en compagnie de farfadet
Date d'inscription : 31/08/2009

MessageSujet: Re: l'histoire de l'autoradio   Mar 3 Jan 2012 - 10:50

alex1303 a écrit:
minicox a écrit:
a mon avis y a pas grand monde qui va capter quelques choses !

c'est pourtant très intéressant...

quand tu comprend l'anglais oui ...
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
VDR
MégaSuperVWtiste
MégaSuperVWtiste
avatar

Nombre de messages : 3073
Age : 39
Localisation : THIONVILLE
Date d'inscription : 16/04/2007

MessageSujet: Re: l'histoire de l'autoradio   Mar 3 Jan 2012 - 11:00

minicox a écrit:
alex1303 a écrit:
minicox a écrit:
a mon avis y a pas grand monde qui va capter quelques choses !

c'est pourtant très intéressant...

quand tu comprend l'anglais oui ...

Une traduction Google, même approximative, devrait suffire...

And you should speak fluent english, it's not so hard...
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
alex1303
MégaSuperVWtiste
MégaSuperVWtiste
avatar

Nombre de messages : 1377
Age : 38
Localisation : (57)
Date d'inscription : 03/08/2006

MessageSujet: Re: l'histoire de l'autoradio   Mar 3 Jan 2012 - 11:00

http://fr.babelfish.yahoo.com/

sinon y'en a d'autre, tu ouvre google et tu tape "traducteur en ligne" dans la petite fenêtre...
sinon si je suis motivé, je fais une trad ce soir ...
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
http://veedub.skynetblogs.be/
Protofuria
Admin
Admin
avatar

Nombre de messages : 7114
Age : 34
Localisation : Metz Beach
Date d'inscription : 20/10/2006

MessageSujet: Re: l'histoire de l'autoradio   Mar 3 Jan 2012 - 15:29

bon voila pour les français pur porc :

COUCHER DE SOLEIL

Un apres midi de 1929, deux jeunes hommes nommés William Lear et Elmer Wavering conduisirent leurs petites amies à un point de vue au dessus de la riviere Mississippi à Quincy en Illinois, pour regarder le coucher de soleil. Cetait une nuit romantique pour sûr mais une des filles remarqua que ça serait encore mieux s'ils pouvaient ecouter de la musique dans la voiture.

Lear et Wavering aimerent l'idée. Les deux homme avaient bidouillé des radios - Lear avait servi comme operateur radio dans la Navy pendant la premiere guerre mondiale - et il ne leur fallut pas longtemps avant de mettre en pieces une radio et d'essayer de la faire fonctionner dans une voiture. Mais ça n'etait pas aussi facile que c'en avait l'air : les automobiles ont des contacteurs d'allumage, dynamos, bougies, et d'autres equipements electriques qui generent de bruyantes interferences statiques, rendant l'écoute de la radio quasi impossible quand le moteur tournait.

ON S'Y MET

Un par un, Lear et Wavering identifierent et eliminerent chaque source d'interference electrique. Quand ils réussirent finalement à faire fonctionner leur radio, ils l'emmenerent à une convention sur la radio à Chicago. Ils y rencontrerent Paul Galvin, proprietaire de Galvin Manufacturing Corporation. Il avec conçu un produit appelé "eliminateur de batterie", un accessoire qui permettait aux radios fonctionnant sur batteries (ou piles) de fonctionner sur du courrant alternatif domestique. Mais comme de plus en plus de maisons etaient raccordées au réseau electrique, de plus en plus de fabricants de radio fabriquerent des radios fonctionnant en alternatif. Galvin avait besoin d'un nouveau produit à fabriquer. Quand il rencontra Lear et Wavering à la convention radio, il le trouva. Il pensait qu'une production de masse d'autoradios abordables avait le potentiel pour devenir un gros marché.

Lear et Wavering installerent leur atelier dans l'usine de Galvin, et quand ils perfectionnerent leur premiere radio, ils l'installerent dans sa Studebaker. Galvin partit alors voir un banquier local pour demander un prêt. Pensant que cela faciliterai les choses, il fit installer une radio dans la Packard du banquier par ses employés. Bonne idée, mais ça ne fonctionna pas -une demie heure apres l'installation, la Packard du banquier prit feu. (ils n'obtinrent pas le prêt).

Galvin ne laissa pas tomber. Il conduisit sa Studebaker à preque 800 miles de là Atlantic City pour montrer la radio à la convention de l'association des fabriquants de radio de 1930. Trop fauché pour louer un stand, il gara la voiture à l'exterieur du batiment de la convention et monta le volume de la radio pour que les participants puissent l'entendre. L'idée fonctionna - il eut suffisement de commandes pour lancer la production de la radio.


L'ORIGINE D'UN NOM

Le premier modele de production etait appelé le 5T71. Galvin décida qu'il devait trouver quelque chose d'un peu plus accrocheur. A cette époque, beaucoup de sociétés dans le business du phonographe et de la radio utilisaient le suffixe "ola" pour leur produits - Radiola, Columbiola, et Victrola etaient trois des plus grand. Galvin décida de faire la meme chose, et comme sa radio etait prévue pour etre utilisée dans un véhicule à moteur, il décida de l'appeler la Motorola.

Mais meme avec un changement de nom, la radio avait toujours des problemes :

Quand la Motorola fut mise en vente en 1930, elle coutait environs 110 dollars sans le montage, à une époque où vous pouviez acheter une voiture neuve pour 650 dollars et ou le pays glissait dans la Grande Depression. (en comparaison, une radio pour une voiture neuve couterait à peu pres 3000 dollars de nos jours.)
En 1930, il fallait plusieurs jours à deux hommes pour installer un autoradio - le tableau de bord devait etre demonté pour installer le recepteur et le haut parleur, et le ciel de toit devait etre coupé pour installer l'antenne. Ces premieres radios fonctionnaient sur leur propres batteries, et non pas sur la batterie de la voiture, il fallait donc percer des trous dans le plancher. Le manuel d'installation avait huit diagrammes complets et 28 pages d'instructions.

EN ROUTE

Vendre des autoradios compliqués qui coutaient 20% du prix d'une voiture neuve n'aurait pas été chose facile dans une bonne période, alors pendant la Grande Depression - Galvin perdit de l'argent en 1930, et eut des difficultés pendant quelques années apres ça. Mais les choses s'ameliorerent en 1933 quand Ford commença à proposer des Motorola pré-installés en usine. En 1934, ils furent encore boostés quand Galvin signa un accord avec le frabricant de pneus BF Goodrich pour les vendre et les installer dans leur chaine de magasins de pneus. A ce moment là, le prix de la radio installation comprise etait descendu à 55 dollars. L'autoradio Motorola etait bel et bien lancé. ( le nom de la société changea officiellement de Galvin Manufacturing à Motorola en 1947.)

Pendant ce temps, Galvin developpa developpa de nouvelles applications pour les autoradios. En 1936, il présenta le changement de station par bouton poussoir, il présenta aussi le Motorola Police Cruiser, une radio standard reglée en usine sur une seule fréquence pour ecouter les transmissions de police. En 1940, il developpa la premiere radio deux voies portable - the Handie Talkie - pour l'armée US.

Beaucoup des technologies de communication que nous tenons pour normales de nos jours sont nées dans les labos de Motorola dans les années qui ont suivi la seconde guerre mondiale. En 1947, ils présenterent la premiere television à se vendre moins de 200 dollars. en 1956 la compagnie présenta le tout premier pageur; en 1969 elle fournit les equipements radio et télévisuels qui fut utilisé pour retransmettre les premiers pas de Neil Armstrong sur la lune. En 1973, ils inventerent le premier telephone cellulaire portable. Aujourd'hui, Motorola est le second producteur de telephones portable au monde. Et tout commença avec le premier autoradio.

QU'EST-CE QUI ARRIVA...

Aux deux hommes qui installerent la premiere radio dans la voiture de Paul Galvin, Elmer Wavering et William Lear prirent deux chemins differents dans la vie. Wavering resta avec Motorola. dans les années 50, il changea encore le monde de l'automobile en developpant le premier alternateur automobile, pour remplacer les inefficaces et peu fiables dynamos. L'invention conduisit à des rafinements tels que les vitres electriques, les sieges electriques et l'air conditionné.

Lear continua aussi à inventer. Il detient plus de 150 brevets. Vous souvenez vous les lecteurs 8 pistes? Lear l'inventa. Mais ce pour quoi il esy vraiment reconnu sont ses contributions au domaine de l'aviation. Il inventa le navigateur radio pour les avions, aida à l'invention du pilote automatique, conçu le premier systeme d'atterrissage completement automatisé, et en 1963, il présenta sa plus fameuse invention, le Lear Jet, le premier jet privé abordable de grande serie. (pas mal pour un gars qui arreta les etudes apres le college)

_________________
No offense, but stock is just so damn boring!
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Contenu sponsorisé




MessageSujet: Re: l'histoire de l'autoradio   

Revenir en haut Aller en bas
 
l'histoire de l'autoradio
Voir le sujet précédent Voir le sujet suivant Revenir en haut 
Page 1 sur 1
 Sujets similaires
-
» l'histoire de l'autoradio
» La petite histoire d"une '65 ....
» Montage autoradio et HP.
» Pose d'une prise RCA IN sur autoradio d'origin
» RCA sur autoradio

Permission de ce forum:Vous ne pouvez pas répondre aux sujets dans ce forum
ACCRO COX LORRAINE :: Espace Détente :: Bar Lorrain-
Sauter vers: